Chủ Nhật, Tháng Một 29, 2023
HomeHealthNow the NHS eyes up robots to help clear Covid backlogs

Now the NHS eyes up robots to help clear Covid backlogs

The robot will have the right to decide the patient’s priority in NHS after they are recruited by a recruitment service to help clear the backlog.

Automated calls will be used by the medical service to assess those awaiting surgery and prioritize their urgency to speed referrals processing.

The plan could see more than 100,000 NHS staff trained in coding and boyish creativity to ease bureaucratic burdens.

The NHS is turning to an automated system to clear the Covid backlog, speed up referrals and improve patient care.

Automated calls will be used by the medical service to assess those awaiting surgery and prioritize their urgency to speed up processing of referrals (stock image)

But the risk of error is very real after 1,800 patients were accidentally removed from a hospital list because the robot’s ‘memory’ was full.

Barking University Hospital, Havering and Redbridge NHS Trust have apologized for the error and promised more oversight of staff.

Pilot plans are in the early stages but one major company told the Telegraph the NHS is looking to use automation in around 100 areas.

But tests have found that 15% of those on the wait list no longer need the treatment they’ve been waiting for, but with 10% more urgent care.

The bot has already been used for waiting lists at hospitals across Lancashire and South Cumbria with 30,000 patients to be assessed in March.

There is great concern about the elderly’s response to the automated calling system.

The plan could see more than 100,000 NHS staff trained in coding and boyish creativity to ease bureaucratic burdens (stock image)

Campaigner Dennis Reed from Silver Voices, a support group for aging populations, told the Telegraph: ‘I’m really worried about the risk of errors and the fact that automated responses won’t be able to deal with it. complexity of healthcare.

‘I think for a lot of older people, getting these types of automated calls can be confusing and very scary. Many will fear it is a scam and not know what to do with it.’

The news comes as the country’s top A&E doctor told the Telegraph that NHS 111 is sending too many people to emergency departments because its computer algorithm is ‘too risky’.

Dr Adrian Boyle, president of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, told MPs that December was the ‘worst ever’ in A&E with wait times of more than 24 hours in most faculties.

‘In terms of how we manage people who may be getting care elsewhere, it’s important to improve NHS 111,’ Dr Boyle told MPs.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk



Source by [author_name]

news6h
news6hhttps://news6h.com
Update the world's latest breaking news online of the day, breaking news, politics, society today, international mainstream news .Updated news 24/7: Entertainment, Sports...at the World everyday world. Hot news, images, video clips that are updated quickly and reliably
RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular